US B1-B Bombers, High-Tech Fighters Flex Muscles at Seoul Air Show

October 21, 2017 16:57, Last Updated: October 21, 2017 17:00

Two U.S. B1-B Lancer bombers joined South Korean Air Force jets in a precision low-altitude flying demonstration at the Seoul Air Show.

Prior to the air show, the B1-Bs engaged in an air-to-surface missile test.

This is the second appearance of the supersonic, nuclear-capable bombers over Korea in the past two weeks.

On Oct. 10, two B1-B Lancers participated in a military drill over the ocean off the Korean coast.

Though ostensibly a commercial air show, where aircraft, helicopters, and aircraft-related products are marketed to airlines, the event was staged at Seoul Air Base, a military facility.

The U.S. and South Korean air forces didn’t waste the opportunity to show off their high-tech products.

The South Korean Airforce F15K team fly in formation during the Seoul Airshow 2009 and Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition 2009 at the Sungnam military air base on October 20, 2009 in Seoul, South Korea. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)
The South Korean air force F15K team fly in formation during the Seoul Airshow 2009 and Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition 2009 at the Sungnam military air base on Oct. 20, 2009, in Seoul, South Korea. (Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

The air show saw an assembly of powerful planes: the latest American F35s and F22s along with South Korean F-15K fighter jets, and the big B1-Bs.

Meanwhile. the nuclear-power USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier task force returned to the South Korean port of Busan on Oct. 21 after a five day joint-forces exercise involving fighter jets, helicopters, and 40 naval ships and submarines from the U.S. and South Korean navies.

The USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) aircraft carrier is seen during a port visit in Hong Kong on October 2, 2017. ( Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)
The USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) aircraft carrier is seen during a port visit in Hong Kong on October 2, 2017. ( Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images)

These exercises come as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump continue to make statements about their willingness to defend their nations and their allies’ territories.

North Korea characterizes the military exercises as “preparations for invasion” and considers them to be a provocation.

The United States describes the joint exercises differently.

“The purpose of those exercises and operations are to enable the combined defense of the Republic of Korea,” said Rear Adm. Marc Dalton, U.S. commander of Carrier Strike Group Five.

An F-22 Raptor shows the internal bays as it does a fly-by during the airshow at Joint Andrews Air Base in Maryland on September 16, 2017. ( Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)
An F-22 Raptor shows the internal bays as it does a fly-by during the airshow at Joint Andrews Air Base in Maryland on Sept. 16, 2017. ( Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States is taking the opportunity to show the North Korean regime exactly what it would face if North Korea were to attack the South.

The military realities might not sway North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, but his generals might be a bit more practical.

On Oct. 10 the White House announced that President Donald Trump will visit South Korea as part of his Asia trip in November.

South Korea’s official Yonhap News Agency reported that Trump might visit the demilitarized zone.

In a pair of tweets, the president cast doubt that he might consider direct talks with North Korea.

“Presidents and their administrations have been talking to North Korea for 25 years, agreements made and massive amounts of money paid hasn’t worked, agreements violated before the ink was dry, makings fools of U.S. negotiators,” he tweeted.

A US Air Force B-1 Lancer bomber flies above the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, on October 18, 2014 as seen from the Turkish border town of Suruc. (Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images)
A U.S. Air Force B-1 Lancer bomber flies above the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, on Oct. 18, 2014, as seen from the Turkish border town of Suruc. (Aris Messinis/AFP/Getty Images)

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